Radon Testing

Radon is an invisible radioactive gas that is commonly found throughout Colorado. Radon gas comes from natural deposits of uranium and radium in soil and seeps into buildings through cracks and gaps in the foundations. Radon gas is a carcinogen and exposure has been linked to causing lung cancer. Depending on whether you’re a smoker or not, the risk of radon exposure and developing lung cancer varies. The following tables from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) distinguish the radon exposure difference between smokers and non-smokers:

IF YOU ARE A SMOKER

Radon Level

If 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*

The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**

WHAT TO DO:

Stop smoking and…

20 pCi/L

About 260 people could get lung cancer

250 times the risk of drowning

Fix your home

10 pCi/L

About 150 people could get lung cancer

200 times the risk of dying in a home fire

Fix your home

8 pCi/L

About 120 people could get lung cancer

30 times the risk of dying in a fall

Fix your home

4 pCi/L

About 62 people could get lung cancer

5 times the risk of dying in a car crash

Fix your home

2 pCi/L

About 32 people could get lung cancer

6 times the risk of dying from poison

Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L

1.3 pCi/L

About 20 people could get lung cancer

Average indoor radon level

Reducing radon levels below 2 pCi/L is difficult

0.4 pCi/L

About 3 people could get lung cancer

Average indoor radon level

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be higher.

*Lifetime risk of lung deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003)

**Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports

pCi/L = picocuries per liter of air

 

IF YOU HAVE NEVER SMOKED

Radon Level

If 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*

The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**

WHAT TO DO:

Stop smoking and…

20 pCi/L

About 36 people could get lung cancer

35 times the risk of drowning

Fix your home

10 pCi/L

About 18 people could get lung cancer

20 times the risk of dying in a home fire

Fix your home

8 pCi/L

About 15 people could get lung cancer

4 times the risk of dying in a fall

Fix your home

4 pCi/L

About 7 people could get lung cancer

The risk of dying in a car crash

Fix your home

2 pCi/L

About 4 people could get lung cancer

The risk of dying from poison

Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L

1.3 pCi/L

About 2 people could get lung cancer

Average indoor radon level

Reducing radon levels below 2 pCi/L is difficult

0.4 pCi/L

 

Average indoor radon level

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be higher.

*Lifetime risk of lung deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003)

**Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports

pCi/L = picocuries per liter of air

 

Foothills Environmental, Inc. is a member of the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST) with staff certified by the National Radon Proficiency Program (NRPP). We have conducted radon testing in schools, commercial properties and residential homes. Contact Foothills Environmental if you would like to learn more about radon gas or have your property tested.